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20120901
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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
explains. >> wolf, this is the sadie may room of the baltimore art. she was a well-known donor, a patron of the arts in baltimore. she lent a painting to this museum many decades ago. in 1951 that painting was stolen from this museum, the circumstances around that are not clear. but it made its way somehow from 1951 to a flea market in west virginia a couple of years ago where it was sold for $7 where it was actually bought at a flea market with just some other kind of trin kwets in a box. it is worth up to or possibly over $100,000. and we're here with the director of the baltimore museum of art. can you tell us how you think it made its way from being stolen here in 1951 to being sold in west virginia at a flea market. >> it's a bigamist ri. of course we may never know the course of the painting. we didn't have computers, we didn't have digital images. things were recorded by hand on index cards, things were mimeographed or carbon paper. very different from how we record information today. so we'll be very lucky, i think, to find out the whole story. >> well, good luck in trying to fin
beat a receiver up all the way down the field. i watched philadelphia and baltimore. and it looked like an episode of oz out in the yard of a prison. >> reporter: former nfl referee jerry austin now a rules analyst for espn's "monday night football" says the labor dispute has to be solved to get the focus back to where it should be. >> what is everybody talking about? >> here's the nfl's leverage. the tv ratings are stratospheric. today the nfl said its telecasts ranked one and two in viewership among all tv programs last week. that nfl games topped the ratings in all 30 local markets. that's the first time that's ever happened. the cbs game between the houston texans and the denver broncos, joe, i'm going to throw this out. guess what the number was? >> i'm scared. >> 24 million viewers. >> that's ridiculous. >> it's riridiculous. people are watching. it may be the train wreck effect. watch for the referees debacles. but they're watching. >> for sure. the interesting thing too is we're starting to see perhaps the ping lumbar swinging back now. the coaches taking heat for the replacemen
in baltimore. but romney continues his push on national securityish shies at an event at a military college in pennsylvania tomorrow. that is a state where he is trailing the president according to recent polls. but it's one the campaign thinks it could put into play, wolf. >> why do they think that? the polls have been very lopsided in pennsylvania not just recently but for weeks and weeks. >> they've looked at that state for some time. they think it's something they could put in play. obviously they know it would be an uphill battle because in recent elections that state has been pretty solidly blue. but, wolf, i have to tell you even though these recent battleground polls have shown romney falling behind in places like ohio and florida, if you look at the attitude of the campaign, they are showing no worry, no concern. they are confident they will make up ground during the debates and this will still be a tight election come election day. >> still plenty of time to go. three debates. a lot can clearly happen. i haven't seen the romney folks put a lot of money in advertising in pennsylvan
of the aisle hope the refs lockout ends soon. this after a disputed field goal gave the baltimore raven a one-point win over the patriots and a series of botched calls and misapplied rules that have driven coaches, players and fans crazy. all this because of a labor dispute between the nfl and its regular referees that began when the league locked out the refs in june. the referees want more money, asking for more than the nfl's offer to increase their average salaries from $149,000 a year to $189,000. compare that to the median nfl player's salary, $770,000 a year. it's important to remember the average nfl playing career is only three and a half years. and most of the refs have other careers. so these aren't full-time jobs for them. the nfl wants to make the refs full-time and to add more refs so the average referee would make less money. the league also wants to move them from a pension systeto a 401(k). but in the context of a business that brings in $9.5 billion a year, it seems relatively solvable. red cashin, an nfl referee for 25 years through two super bowls doesn't blame the replace
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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